BREAKING: Miami-Dade County Commission stands with the LGBTQ community


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If you've been following the news lately, you've probably heard about anti-LGBTQ laws recently passed in Mississippi and North Carolina.

These laws, which criminalize bathroom use by transgender people and sanction discrimination against LGBTQ North Carolinians and Mississippians, are similar to proposals SAVE beat back in the Florida legislature in 2015 and 2016.

We are glad to report that the Miami Dade County Commission has just passed by a vote of 7-3 a key resolution -- introduced by equality champion and 2014 SAVE Action PAC candidate Daniella Levine Cava -- to begin the process of joining those pro-equality jurisdictions, like the Cities of Miami Beach and Wilton Manors, which have suspended business ties with North Carolina and Mississippi.


Add your name below to thank Commissioner Levine Cava, Mayor Gimenez and their colleagues on the Miami Dade County Commission for standing up for equality.

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We commend Commissioners Daniella Levine Cava, Dennis Moss, Audrey Edmonson, Barbara Jordan, Bruno Barreiro, Sally Heyman and Chairman Jean Monestime for voting YES to take this action, which will help bolster the nationwide movement to overturn these discriminatory and anti-LGBTQ laws -- especially in addition to the action taken by the Cities of Miami Beach and Wilton Manors in recent weeks.

What we warned lawmakers would happen in Florida has come to pass in North Carolina, where top companies like PayPal, Lionsgate and Deutsche Bank have cut hundreds of jobs in response to the hastily-passed HB2 there.

The same is happening in Mississippi, where official government-funded travel has been banned by a growing list of jurisdictions that includes New York and Washington states, in addition to Miami-Dade County, Miami Beach, and Wilton Manors.

While similar proposals are dead in Tallahassee for now in part due to SAVE's vigorous advocacy during the 2015-2016 legislative session, you can be sure extremist anti-LGBTQ opponents will continue to push these awful bills.

We must remain vigilant and ready to make our voices heard when the time comes -- and we must give our all to support pro-equality leaders like those who stood up today at the Miami-Dade County Commission.

Thank you for your support.

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  • commented 2016-05-04 11:40:58 -0400
    I was a local police sergeant in the Miami area. I volunteered for years in the mid- to late-1990’s to support SAVE/Dade, often doing things like organizing and leading VIP security details, going door-to-door campaigning for S/D friendly politicians, and leading security details at S/D fundraisers and other events. The then director of S/D, Jorge Mursuli, convinced me to testify before the Miami-Dade County Commission (and at one other city commission) about the workplace discrimination I had encountered as an openly gay police officer after I came out in my department in 1986. Although I spoke in a generally positive fashion about how my chief at the time had courageously supported me, the next chief took great umbrage at my public disclosure before the MDCC, which was televised. A couple of interviews also were published in local gay newspapers shortly thereafter. The new chief and the major thus started a coordinated campaign of workplace harassment and dirty tricks that were far worse than what I had ever experienced before. This began shortly after the Miami-Dade GLBT-inclusive equality ordinance passed. In exasperation, I appealed to S/D’s then director for some modicum of help, suggesting perhaps a member of the S/D legal staff could write a cease-and-desist letter or at least provide some legal advice. Despite a virtually spotless record and exceptional performance reviews for the previous 14 years, my job, career and professional reputation were suddenly being threatened because of administrative retaliation. S/D did absolutely nothing to help me. That left me deeply discouraged and disillusioned about GLBT volunteerism. I resigned from my police department after winning my legal battle, thanks to the only support I could get, which was from my police union, but not from any LGBT or AIDS organization I had volunteered for. In 2001 I left the US permanently and, quite frankly, out of disgust for having been left to hang in the wind by the people I had supported during my years of volunteerism. It was the SAVE/Dade director himself who had urged me to go public, which was the cause of the workplace harassment. I continued working for another 5 years as a UN police/peacekeeper, eventually ending up as commander of my own border police station in the Balkans and I spent a year as a police academy trainer in Iraq on military bases, before retiring to Germany in order to marry my same-sex partner. Germany is where I live to this day. In closing, I hope SAVE/Dade has learned to “have the backs” of their most valuable resource, which I assume is a sizable volunteer contingent.
  • commented 2016-05-04 09:08:48 -0400
    As a local police officer, I volunteered for years in the late 1990’s for SAVE/Dade, doing things like organizing and leading VIP security details, going for-to-door campaigning for S/D friendly politicians, and leading security teams at S/D fundraisers and other events. One of my last contributions to S/D was to testify before the Miami-Dade County Commission about problems I encountered as an openly gay police officer when I came out in 1986. Although I spoke in a generally positive fashion about how my chief had supported me, the next chief took great umbrage at my work and he thus started a coordinated campaign of harassment and dirty tricks that began shortly after Miami-Dade’s equality ordinance passed. I appealed to S/D’s director at the time for some modicum of assistance, perhaps that the org’s legal staff member write a cease and desist letter or provide some legal advice because my very job was then being threatened as retaliation. S/D did absolutely nothing to help me. I left my police department after winning my legal battle, thanks to support from my police union and not any LGBT or AIDS organization I had volunteered for. I also left the US permanently out of disgust for being left to hang in the wind after those years of volunteerism. I continued for another 5 years as UN peacekeeper and as trainer in Iraq and then retired to Germany to marry my same-sex partner, and this is where I remain to this day.
  • commented 2016-05-04 09:02:50 -0400
    Who were the three who voted against?
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